09.07.06 Broken Music Fan Club DVD now being shipped...


The Broken Music Fan Club DVD which will be issued to Premium members who renewed their memberships for a third consecutive year has started to ship out. Trailers for the DVD and a slideshow of images can be viewed in the Exclusives section of the website. The documentary style DVD contains over two and half hours of material filmed during tour rehearsals in Tuscany and on the US Broken Music tour in Spring 2005.

Once all the DVD's have shipped out to the these members the DVD will be made available for all club members to purchase from the Sting.com store if they wish to obtain a copy. The Sacred Love Fan Club DVD is now available for basic members to purchase via the store if they wish to obtain a copy. See https://store.sting.com/ for more information.
DVD includes behind-the-scenes, never-before-seen footage and over 60 rare song performances from The Police. A must for all Police fans...
09.04.06BILLBOARD
Sting says he's fully aware that an album of 16th century lute songs is not exactly a commercial slam-dunk. But he's holding out hope that his 'Songs From the Labyrinth', due Oct. 10 via Deutsche Grammophon, will find an audience. "I keep saying it - you just never know," says Sting, who recorded the album with lute player Edin Karamazov from Sarajevo. "I think this is a longer shot than ['O Brother, Where Art Thou?'] but... why not? The response so far has been very encouraging. People have said, 'Wow, this is totally different. How refreshing.' I don't know - that may translate into mass appeal or it may not...
09.03.06STERN
"Pop is dead. Rock music is dying." Harsh words - spoken by somebody who became "filthy-rich" by this music: Sting has discovered classical music and published an album with 400 year old songs. A conversation about the banality of old habits and the thrill of the past. Sting, you were always a trendsetter of Rock. Now you unbury a 16th century composer: John Dowland. He sang to women in the Elizabethan age. Don't you have something new to tell...?
09.02.06BBC MUSIC
There's something a little odd going on. Sting comes off stage after his Bergen concert, hits the hotel bar and opens a bottle of Chablis. And then he talks about 18th century keyboard music. I suppose I started it. There's a song of his I particularly like for its harmonic interest: 'Whenever I Say Your Name', a duet with the American R&B star Mary J Blige from his 2203 album 'Sacred Love'. So I ask him about it. "It's based entirely on Bach," he reveals, not without a little pride in his voice. "Look at the bass line and you'll see it's all him. It's one of his preludes - in C, I think..."
09.01.06FOX 411
Sting loves to pick at strings. Everyone remembers him from Police videos playing his favorite instrument, the upright bass. It's the sound that gave the Police songs their timeless originality. But last year, Sting decided to try a new stringed instrument - the lute. You don't hear a lot of lutes on pop records. You hear mandolins, but no lutes. They are usually left to classical musicians with a lot of training. You know that wouldn't stop Sting. The result is a new album that drops next month, called 'Songs from the Labyrinth', for which Sting has used the songs of 16th century composer John Dowland for his foundation...