August 04, 2007

MIX

it's gotta be a tough gig: You're mixing for one of the most recognizable names in rock history who have not toured together - or produced music together - in almost 23 years. Fans pour into the packed stadiums, shelling out top money per seat (the band is donating a portion of the proceeds to WaterAid, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving sanitation and safe-water access in poor countries), just to get a glimpse of vocalist/bassist Sting, drummer Stewart Copeland and guitarist Andy Summers perform such classic Police hits as 'Message in a Bottle', 'Driven to Tears', 'Murder By Numbers' and so many more from their currently million-selling catalog. Sting told Rolling Stone in an interview during tour rehearsals in Vancouver that he committed to a world tour "to go back, retrace those steps and make the band better. I have played these songs for years. I know things about the music I didn't know then or couldn't express. I'm a better bandleader now than I was then..."
July 18, 2007

THE COURIER MAIL

Hundreds of roadies, technicians and security bustle around the giant stage as Sting, Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland soundcheck that afternoon for a massive hometown show at Dodgers Stadium after a handful of sold-out arena concerts throughout California. While they were acknowledged as a British band back in the late '70s and early '80s, Summers and Copeland live in LA and Sting has an absolutely incredible home in Malibu...
July 14, 2007

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

When the Police split up 23 years ago, they were the world's biggest band... and possibly its most competitive. As they embark on a £100 million reunion tour, Chris Salewicz looks in on their rehearsals at Sting's Tuscan villa, and finds they've swapped punch-ups for pilates. OK, everybody: pilates on the lawn at 8am tomorrow,' Sting says as he heads up the stone steps of his 20-room Tuscan mansion to bed. It's 11pm. Limping slightly, drummer Stewart Copeland, who at 54 is a year younger than Sting, and guitarist Andy Summers, sipping from a mug of camomile tea, follow soon afterwards...
July 10, 2007

THE MIAMI HERALD

Police think big for summer tour - The Police tour, the trio's first such endeavor in 23 years, has not only thrust songs like 'So Lonely' and 'King of Pain' into our collective memory banks, but also the concept of stadium shows back into a national discourse. South Florida hasn't seen a stadium tour of this magnitude since megagroups U2 and the Rolling Stones played within weeks of each other in 1997 in Miami-Dade. And despite woes in the music industry, the Police tour is a money-maker, ranking as Ticketmaster's No. 1 "most requested event" of the year thus far, dethroning the mighty Broadway musical Wicked. The Police also top the list of all concert tours, grossing an average $3.4 million per date, comfortably ahead of No. 2, Kenny Chesney's $1.3 million, according to Pollstar, a concert industry trade magazine and website...
July 07, 2007

MOJO

The Police rose from phony '77 punks to global '80s stadium kings before crumbling in a fug of verbal cruelty. Now they're back. Phil Sutcliffe joins their world tour for the full astonishing story of chaos, coke and power struggles, and finds they still ''drive each other nuts''. Soundcheck. Not long now; the comeback gig's only three hours away. But they don't look nervous. Even when their faces appear in enormous close-up on the big screens above them. Even though tonight, May 28, 2007, Vancouver GM Place hockey arena, it's their first concert proper for more than 20 years since they broke up in discord and disarray. They're talking to each other on-mike, meeting each other's gaze with grave attention, their intimate conversation echoing around the banks of empty bucket seats...
July 04, 2007

UNCUT

July 03, 2007

SOURCE

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