January 28, 2015

New Zealand Herald: Paul Simon and Sting talk to Russell Baillie about the pair's joint tour that lands in Auckland on Friday and New Plymouth on Saturday...

On the end of one line is Paul Simon, somewhere in New England. On the other is Sting, somewhere in New York. They would be rehearsing together for their joint tour which hits Auckland tomorrow night and New Plymouth on Saturday, but for the fact that the former bassist frontman of The Police has to see off the final shows of his Broadway show The Last Ship - based on the shipbuilding industry of his hometown, Newcastle - before it closes, having been less than a runaway success. Ah well, it happens to the best of them - Simon's 1997 Broadway show The Capeman lost millions. But before Sting headed into theatre land, the pair had been on tour together in the United States, with reviews suggesting the seemingly incongruous partnership worked a treat, with individual sets and shared numbers, which have seen Sting in the Art Garfunkel role on some of Simon's biggest songs...

December 04, 2014

Sting, the tireless troubadour - reports The Washington Post...

Night after night, as the lights go down in the Neil Simon Theatre and musicians on guitar and flute and fiddle begin to play, a multiple Grammy-winning international star settles into a seat in a back row and drinks in anew all the Broadway sights and sounds. It's the closest that a guy named Sting will ever get to the life of an average Manhattan commuter. "I watch it every day," says the 63-year-old singer-songwriter, still in possession of the sleek build of a rock sensation half his age. "I'm fascinated by the process and the actors making this story and the songs their own. I'm fascinated by the audience and how they react. I sit way in the back in the dark, sort of a phantom, and l leave before the lights go up."

November 05, 2014

Every Big Thing Sting Does Is Magic - In an exclusive New York Observer interview, Sting chats about "The Last Ship," his passion for his wife, and how The Police became a "prison."

It's Thursday noon, four days after Sting's semi-autobiographical Broadway musical The Last Ship has opened at last. The famous English rock star, now 63, with the body of a 21-year-old, is loping around his Central Park West aerie mostly grinning. On Sunday morning, Sting tells me, he felt a strange dread he couldn't shake. For months he'd been spooked by nightmares of Ben Brantley coming in and killing his labor of love. Then it was announced that theater critic Charles Isherwood would be dispatched instead. "I always knew we'd come to that day, and everything would turn to shit," he says...


1
October 15, 2014

The New York Times: From Newcastle to Broadway - Sting and Jimmy Nail on the Musical 'The Last Ship'...

Jimmy Nail was having an out-of-body moment. His lanky frame was folded in an armchair in the low-ceilinged basement lounge of the Neil Simon Theater for an interview, but his tired eyes suddenly searched the room's four corners, as if he were trying to see beyond its walls: back to Newcastle-on-Tyne, back to the shipyards where he and the men of his family once toiled. "I worked on big turbines that propelled the supertankers," said Mr. Nail, the son of a shipyard foreman who plays one in the new musical "The Last Ship," which has songs by another Newcastle native with a sharp-edged moniker, Sting. "You had a turbine shed that might have been four times the length of this room, and in the middle of it was a turbine, and men were crawling all over it like ants, welding it and polishing it."

September 06, 2014

Sting article/interview in Arrive magazine...

The Last Ship - Sting's Broadway Musical tells the story of love, loss and everlasting reckoning - In a bright, airy rehearsal studio, eight floors above 42nd Street, a man at work chews on a fingertip and furrows his exceedingly familiar brow. As a cast of rugged men and women, looking as likely to populate a pub in the north of England as a Broadway stage, sways on stools and uncoils rounds of rope, belting out a rousing shanty, the familiar brow darkens, a foot taps anxiously to the beat, arms wrapping tight around a slim torso like a self-enforces straitjacket. Sting is tense...

June 22, 2014

As one of the world’s most successful rock stars, he has risen from an impoverished childhood to amass a huge fortune - Daily Mail interview...

Why my children will not be inheriting my £180million fortune: Sting wants his sons and daughters to earn their way (and says he's spending all his money anyway). As one of the world's most successful rock stars, he has risen from an impoverished childhood to amass a huge fortune. Now Sting has made it clear that his children will also have to earn their own way and should not expect to benefit from his £180 million earnings. In a frank interview in today's Mail on Sunday Event magazine, the former Police frontman said he expected his three sons and three daughters to work, and added that there would not be much left to inherit anyway...

archive