October 15, 2014

The New York Times: From Newcastle to Broadway - Sting and Jimmy Nail on the Musical 'The Last Ship'...

Jimmy Nail was having an out-of-body moment. His lanky frame was folded in an armchair in the low-ceilinged basement lounge of the Neil Simon Theater for an interview, but his tired eyes suddenly searched the room's four corners, as if he were trying to see beyond its walls: back to Newcastle-on-Tyne, back to the shipyards where he and the men of his family once toiled. "I worked on big turbines that propelled the supertankers," said Mr. Nail, the son of a shipyard foreman who plays one in the new musical "The Last Ship," which has songs by another Newcastle native with a sharp-edged moniker, Sting. "You had a turbine shed that might have been four times the length of this room, and in the middle of it was a turbine, and men were crawling all over it like ants, welding it and polishing it."

September 06, 2014

Sting article/interview in Arrive magazine...

The Last Ship - Sting's Broadway Musical tells the story of love, loss and everlasting reckoning - In a bright, airy rehearsal studio, eight floors above 42nd Street, a man at work chews on a fingertip and furrows his exceedingly familiar brow. As a cast of rugged men and women, looking as likely to populate a pub in the north of England as a Broadway stage, sways on stools and uncoils rounds of rope, belting out a rousing shanty, the familiar brow darkens, a foot taps anxiously to the beat, arms wrapping tight around a slim torso like a self-enforces straitjacket. Sting is tense...

June 22, 2014

As one of the world’s most successful rock stars, he has risen from an impoverished childhood to amass a huge fortune - Daily Mail interview...

Why my children will not be inheriting my £180million fortune: Sting wants his sons and daughters to earn their way (and says he's spending all his money anyway). As one of the world's most successful rock stars, he has risen from an impoverished childhood to amass a huge fortune. Now Sting has made it clear that his children will also have to earn their own way and should not expect to benefit from his £180 million earnings. In a frank interview in today's Mail on Sunday Event magazine, the former Police frontman said he expected his three sons and three daughters to work, and added that there would not be much left to inherit anyway...

June 19, 2014

Sting navigates the waters of Broadway musicals with 'The Last Ship'...

Sting vividly recalls walking out the door of his childhood home in Wallsend, a shipbuilding town on the northeastern coast of England, and being confronted by the massive form of one of the vessels whose construction was the lifeblood of an entire community from the 1860s until the shipyard was closed in 2007. "You'd watch this great hulking thing rise up over time, and then it would be set out to sea, and the whole process would start all over again," recalled the singer-songwriter who forged his career as a member of the new wave rock band, The Police, and then went on to work as a solo performer whose music has incorporated elements of rock, jazz, reggae, new-age, worldbeat and classical (from the English Renaissance composer John Dowland to Prokofiev and Kurt Weill). Along the way he also picked up 16 Grammy Awards and sold close to 100 million records...

June 06, 2014

Sting on 'The Last Ship' in Chicago - and the cargo he's been carrying...

Sometime around 2004, Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, better known as Sting, a rock star with 16 Grammys and more than 100 million records sold, found himself with a severe case of writer's block. It wasn't that he stopped touring (he didn't), making money (he still made plenty) or even recording (there were albums of other people's songs and a new symphonic treatment of his past material), but he found, to his chagrin, he could not write any new songs. This went on for some eight years. He was, in the words of writer John Logan, "at an impasse." The title of Sting's intensely personal, strikingly reflective 2003 autobiography, "Broken Music," had proven prophetic...

June 04, 2014

Sting embarks on a singular creative voyage, and returns to his roots, with the musical The Last Ship, making its worldwide debut in Chicago this month...

During a recent performance in New York, Sting told the story of how, in his shipbuilding hometown of Wallsend, northern England, when a particularly large vessel was finished, the queen would sometimes visit for the christening. On one such occasion, Sting, then a young boy, standing on the side of the road, caught her eye, and she waved to him from her royal limousine. And that, he says, was when he decided: "I didn't want to be on that street. I didn't want to end up working in that shipyard. I wanted to be in that limousine!"

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