November 15, 2010

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

June 15, 2010

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

Sting's classical effect: The former Police front man is touring with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra. Unlike his former band's reunion tour, he is enjoying himself. As the afternoon sun poured through the living room window of his grand apartment overlooking Central Park, Sting was calmly reflecting on his trying reunion with the Police, and anticipating, with genuine excitement, his current tour with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra, performing imaginative new versions of his solo and Police hits...
June 13, 2010

THE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE

Sting turns to symphonic pop - Concert tour, album a bold move in rocker's musical journey. It's purely a coincidence, Sting insisted with a chortle, that he and Peter Gabriel each decided to tour and record this year with full orchestras - two Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees doing highbrow symphonic-pop projects at nearly the same time...
June 11, 2010

ROLLING STONE

In a cavernous studio on West 26th Street in Manhattan, Sting is rehearsing for his ambitious summer world tour, in which he'll rework solo and Police hits with the 45-piece Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra. As the massive band runs through his 1985 single 'Russians', Sting kicks his legs out like a Cossack dancer, and during the Police's 'Next To You', he playfully waves his arms like a conductor. Later, at his apartment on Central Park West, Sting explains that the idea of exploring his catalogue came in 2008, when he was invited to perform with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra...
May 30, 2010

THE FINANCIAL TIMES

Outside the graffiti-scrawled white walls of Abbey Road studios, Japanese tourists are photographing their friends in Beatles poses on the world's most famous pedestrian crossing. Inside is a maze of studios. The largest is Studio One, where there is a 45-piece orchestra - young men and women clad mainly in jeans and shirts - as well as a guitarist, percussionist and blonde female vocalist. They are being put through their paces by Steven Mercurio, a wiry, energetic conductor. Tucked behind him, sitting straight-backed on a stool and wordlessly nodding to the opening bars of 'Field of Gold', is Sting...
March 15, 2010

THE NEW YORK TIMES

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