May 20, 2007

THE NEW YORK POST

Police Presence - Legendary trio improving 'new muic', friendshp for reunion tour: Most of the Police fans who helped the band sell out its summer reunion tour think they're going to see the classic pop-rock trio revisit glory days. But Stewart Copeland says they're in for a surprise. "It's all-new music we'll be playing," he says. What? When the Police headline the Live Earth festival on July 7 and play their sold-out solo dates at Madison Square Garden (Aug. 1 and 3) and Giants Stadium (Aug. 5), there won't be any 'Roxanne', 'Don't Stand So Close to Me' or 'King of Pain'? Not exactly...
April 23, 2007

GUITAR PLAYER

It hit me without warning, and the force of guitar geekism smacked me so hard that I found myself fighting back those tears of bliss that often plague Italians, soap-opera divas, and unrepentant sissies. I was drifting around Andy Summers' Venice Beach, California, office/ photo studio/rehearsal space when the Police guitarist casually plugged into his Bradshaw rig and launched into the thrilling, mesmerizing arpeggios of 'Message in a Bottle'. Even naked, without support from Sting's swooping bass line and Stewart Copeland's propulsive drums, the sheer beauty of Summers' tone, phrasing, and chord movement is extremely moving. It's also somewhat astonishing that the part still sounds modern and fresh 28 years after it first blasted from phonographs and car radios...
March 04, 2007

THE SUNDAY TIMES

Cop idols: They said a reunion would be an act of insanity. So what changed their minds? Under intense interrogation, the Police break down and confess all. Interview by Chrissy Iley. There is only a small industry crowd of 100 or so, gathered in the cavernous dome that is the Staples Center, LA, home to the Grammys. It's a technical run-through. It's boring. Beyoncé has an unfortunate fringe cut that is sucked into her mouth each time she sings the opening strain of Listen, her Dreamgirls anthem. The crowd stare glumly at the giant monitor and her giant flapping fringe...
February 18, 2007

THE NEW YORK TIMES

They Can Play. Can They Play Nice? In a high-ceilinged studio at the Lions Gate film complex earlier this month, the Police were rehearsing for a very public first gig: opening the Grammy awards broadcast last Sunday with their 1978 hit "Roxanne" before announcing a world tour the next day. Sting, 55, on bass; Andy Summers, 64, on guitar; and Stewart Copeland, 54, on drums, were working through a list of two dozen songs. For the first time in decades the Police would be back together for more than one night. "I've trapped myself back 30 years," Sting said...
October 20, 2006

RECORD COLLECTOR

In the closing pages of his 2003 memoir, 'Broken Music', Sting reveals that he didn't go to his parents funerals. Such was the global adulation and tabloid interest in The Police, and in his subsequent solo career, that he felt his attendance might turn either occasion into a 'degrading circus'. To pull out of prior professional commitments, he said, would also have created numerous logistical headaches, affecting the livelihoods of scores of people who relied on a bloke with a bass to put food on their tables...
October 10, 2006

THE GLOBE & MAIL

Sting has picked up the music of John Dowland, writes Robert Everett-Green. It's centuries old, but loaded with pop hooks. Lots of rock stars cover old songs, but hardly any go quite as far as Sting. The tunes on his latest album are all at least 400 years old, and were well known to the first English queen named Elizabeth. 'Songs from the Labyrinth', just out on Deutsche Grammophon, is almost entirely devoted to the music of John Dowland, a composer and lutenist who died in 1626. A giant in the eyes of music historians, Dowland was also, according to Sting, the first English pop star to have an international career...
October 09, 2006

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Sting has exchanged his guitar for a lute, returning to the renaissance for inspiration. He tells John Allison why melancholy and self-reflection are the new rock'n'roll. 'Melancholy is no bad thing' says Sting. His cat Carbonnel dozes on my lap as we sit having a quiet talk at Lake House, the singer's Elizabethan pile in Wiltshire. The backdrop is fitting, for we are discussing his latest project - obsession, really - and his most unexpected album yet, 'Songs from the Labyrinth'. It features such Elizabethan classics as 'Come again: sweet love doth now invite' and 'The lowest trees have tops', songs by one of the greatest of all English composers, John Dowland...
October 08, 2006

LA MONDE DE LA MUSIQUE

Sting Pour l’amour de Dowland: La star du rock publie un disque de melodies de John Dowland, un compositeur anglais du XVIr siecle, ou il chante et joue du luth. One des multiples facettes d'un homme etonnant et attachant. Rencontre à Lyon, pour un des fares entretiens que la star a accordés à la presse française. Nous sommes aut ant impressionnés les tins que les autres : lui qui parle pour la premiere fois à des "specialistes" de musique classique, nous qui voyons ce mythe en chair et en os...

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