October 06, 2006

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

The first time Sting and the lutanist Edin Karamazov met, years ago, Mr. Karamazov's group was performing the music of Mozart, Vivaldi and Khatchaturian between acts at the Circus Roncalli in Hamburg, Germany, and Sting was in the audience. Afterward, the British pop star invited the group to come to his estate in England to play at a birthday party. As Sting tells it, the answer was a curt no, with Mr. Karamazov informing him they were serious musicians and not "performing monkeys" at his beck and call...
October 05, 2006

EARLY MUSIC AMERICA

The British rock star talks about his fascination with the music of the great Elizabethan lutenist. "The song is so magical that it blew me away when I first heard it. There is simply no precedent for this song. It exists completely alone, and I love singing it." The song is John Dowland's 'In Darkness Let Me Dwell', and the singer is Sting. That's right, Sting, who as a member of The Police and as a successful solo artist, has made dozens of pop and rock CDs. And now for something completely different: Sting and lutenist Edin Karamazov have just released 'Song From The Labyrinth', a recording of Dowland songs, on the Deutsche Grammophon record label...
October 03, 2006

LE MONDE

La nouvelle s'est ébruitée il y a quelques mois : Sting, le chanteur du groupe britannique The Police et star du rock qui poursuit depuis 1985 une carrière planétaire en solo, allait faire paraître un disque consacré à la musique de John Dowland (1563-1626), le plus connu des compositeurs de l'époque élisabéthaine. Qui plus est, l'enregistrement devait être édité sous le fameux cartouche jaune de l'éditeur Deutsche Grammophon, la plus prestigieuse étiquette de musique classique, propriété d'Universal...
October 03, 2006

CBS SUNDAY MORNING

Sting's Journey Through History - The Former Police Frontman Is Taking A Musical Journey Back In Time With His New Album. John Dowland was born in 1563. He was known to be England's finest lutenist, which was the instrument of the time. He wrote beautiful, timeless, melancholy songs that touched rock-star Sting. His new album, 'Songs From The Labyrinth', is a collection of those incredible songs written by John Dowland more than 500 years ago. The album is a musical journey back in time and a loving tribute from one rock star to another...
October 02, 2006

USA TODAY

Centuries before the world came to know a rock star called Sting - or any rock star, for that matter - another English troubadour traveled the globe, playing songs about love and yearning, isolation and despair. "John Dowland was our first alienated singer/songwriter," Sting says. "A totally conflicted man but a genius musician. We're just following in his footsteps..."
October 01, 2006

DIE WELT

Jetzt hat auch Sting die Lieder von John Dowland aus der Shakespeare-Zeit eingespielt. Dessen ergreifende und ausschweifende Melodien übertrumpfte damals kein anderer Künstler. Eine Reise rückwärts in ein goldenes Zeitalter mit Trauerrand. Es war einmal ein Musiker, der reiste länger in Europa herum, als er zu Hause war. Er wurde gefeiert, wo immer er hin kam und auftrat. Er wurde mit Geschenken überhäuft. Er war ein Wunder auf seinem Instrument. Er war so etwas wie ein Pop-Star. Er wurde an Höfen, an denen er arbeitete, besser bezahlt als Staatsminister. Er war ein Marketinggenie...
October 01, 2006

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

The singer's latest album explores the music of a pop balladeer from a distant era, John Dowland. The hard part was learning the lute. On a Warner Bros. Television sound stage, Sting is perched on a stool, singing a plaintive, urgent ballad to an absent lover. No surprises here - except that the song, "Come Again," is more than 400 years old. It was composed by John Dowland, a contemporary of Shakespeare who is considered one of England's greatest songwriters...
September 27, 2006

'LABYRINTH' PRESS RELEASE

In 1982 I was performing at the Drury Lane Theatre in Covent Garden, as part of a variety show on behalf of Amnesty International. After the solo performance of one of my songs, the actor John Bird came to pay me a quiet compliment, and asked whether I'd ever heard the songs of John Dowland. I was forced to admit that, while I knew the name, and, vaguely, the fact that Dowland had been an Elizabethan/Jacobean composer, I knew little else. I thanked Mr. Bird for his compliment and was still intrigued enough the next day to seek out a collection of Dowland's songs performed by Peter Pears, with Julian Bream on lute. While I appreciated the melancholy beauty of this music, I couldn't quite see how it could ever be assimilated into the repertoire of an aspiring rock singer...

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