He's the ordinary bloke (with seven homes and a butler). The Tantric sex guru (who adores lapdancers). The eco-warrior (who promotes gas guzzlers). As he finally admits he's fooled his fans, who IS the real Sting? Sting's favourite home (out of the seven he owns) is The Lake House in Wiltshire, an outstandingly beautiful Elizabethan manor house made from local limestone and flint, with mullioned windows and decorative gables...
Sting: the sex wasn't tantric, it was frantic. EVERYONE knows that Sting practises epic bouts of tantric sex with his wife Trudie Styler because they have often boasted about it. But it seems there has been some mistake. What he really meant was "frantic" sex. In an interview to be broadcast next week on BBC1, Sting confesses that the whole story of how he used yoga to achieve prolonged states of ecstasy has been "a joke"...
04.01.04LIVEWIRE
Sting's Tale: He's one of the world's most successful musicians, is a multi-millionaire and was awarded a CBE last October. But Sting's recently published memoirs show life hasn't always been easy. As the UK leg of his 'Sacred Love' tour brings him back to Newcastle, Alan Jackson reflects on the stark boyhood that shaped the famous Geordie's future...
At home with Sting: Sting is perching on one of his battered leather antique sofas. He is wearing immaculately cut dark trousers with faint pinstripes, and a superfine cotton shirt with blue and white stripes, unbuttoned nearly to the waist to reveal a lithe, almost hairless chest. He is a mixture of shyness, confidence and dry wit. Perhaps he's aware that he's taking a risk by inviting me to his grand country home set in acres of organic farm in Wiltshire. The house manages to be lavish, but is also filled with homeliness and flowers. There's not a liveried servant in sight...
02.05.04GRAMMY
Sting will be honored as the MusiCares 2004 Person Of The Year on February 6 at a special tribute performance and dinner in Los Angeles, recognizing his accomplishments as an artist and humanitarian. MusiCares' mission is to ensure that music people have a compassionate place to turn in times of need while focusing the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community...
The MusiCares foundation will bestow on Friday its person of the year honor on singer, songwriter and humanitarian Sting. From founding seminal rock group the Police in 1977 to his prolific solo work beginning in 1985, Sting has proven himself to be a musical force as well as an activist. In 1989, he and his wife Trudie Styler founded the Rainforest Foundation to protect the indigenous peoples in those regions. To date, the organization has raised more than $18 million. As a solo artist, Sting has garnered 10 Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, an Emmy and three Oscar nominations. He's also tried his hand at acting, appearing in more than 10 films and recently added author to his list of achievements with the publication of his memoir, 'Broken Music'. He recently spoke with The Hollywood Reporter's music editor Tamara Conniff...
A Life Less Ordinary: Sting can remember being by his father's side when he died. In a moment of rare intimacy between the two men, he took his father's hands in his own for the first time since early childhood. "I looked from his eyes to the cross on the wall and then down at his two hands cradled in mine. It was then that I received something like the jolt of an electric shock, because his hands and mine were identical. 'We have the same hands, Dad. Look...'"
12.09.03STING.COM
Part 1 of an interview with Sting and Gerry Richardson by Chris Salewicz took place in September 2003 for Sting.com...
12.09.03STING.COM
Part 2 of an interview with Sting and Gerry Richardson by Chris Salewicz took place in September 2003 for Sting.com...
Sting, in Toronto on the weekend to perform at MuchMoreMusic and to promote a new album and book, admits he gave half a thought to checking out Bono's appearance at the Liberal leadership convention on Friday night. "I found out Bono was here after my show," said Sting, 52, during a Saturday afternoon interview in a suite at the Windsor Arms Hotel. "But I was too tired to go and see him." The coincidence of the two universally recognizable pop stars being in Toronto at the same time, while not quite cosmic, was at least noteworthy...
Sting in the tale: The legendary singer has always told his life story through his distinctive music. Now, with a revealing new autobiography on the shelves, the former Police frontman fills in some of the gaps. Born Gordon Sumner, the son of a Geordie milkman, Sting has come a long way since his tough, Tyneside childhood. After paying his dues playing on cruise ships, he found fame in the 70s with The Police, and went on to carve out a solo career that has endured like few others over the years. And, with a new album out now and an autobiography released this month, Sting has confirmed his status as one of the most respected musicians in the industry today...
11.14.03CANADA AM
Sting's latest labour of love: his memoir: Well, Sting, thank you very much for taking the time to talk with me this afternoon. I am fascinated with your book. I find it so amazing when so many entertainers have taken the time to write about celebrity and life on the road and you chose to write about everything up until that moment. What motivated you to do that...?
11.12.03THE GUARDIAN
Sting's tale: He's one of the world's most successful musicians, introduced Guy Ritchie to Madonna and has just been made a CBE. He has also written his memoirs - and doing it plunged him into depression. So why does everyone mock him? And why are we so obsessed by his tantric sex life? Emma Brockes hears the confessions of an 'ordinary' superstar...
11.11.03TRACKS
After a period of depression and soul-searching, Sting returns with a new album, a new book and new faith in timeless truth. If the wise men of Spinal Tap are to be believed, Stonehenge is "a magic place/Where the moon doth rise with a dragon's face." But from a grassy ridge outside Salisbury, England, that overlooks the monument, Stonehenge is actually both more and less strange than that. A motorway runs close by, so it's not as isolated as photos often suggest, and it covers a smaller area than you might expect. Still, the massive stones towering over the visitors circling their bases are a mind-blowing sight...
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