Soul Cages
Mar
04
1991
Norfolk, USHampton Coliseum
With Concrete Blonde, Vinx
0
share

Versatile Sting - 'Friends' in top form...

Sting's innately expressive voice has mellowed.

As the former frontman of legendary pop/punksters The Police, acclaimed songwriter of three solo albums, social and environmental activist, and movie star, Sting slips quite easily into the category of pop icon. But his relaxed and genial performance Monday night belied any evidence of a self-absorbed superstar.

In fact, Sting opened his show by introducing another artist to the crowded house at the Hampton Coliseum, a vocalist/percussionist named Vinx. Beating tribal rhythms on a pair of unusual bongolike drums, Sting's protege sang soulful a cappella in a ranging, husky voice similar to his mentor's.

Sting and his four-piece band then took the stage, awash in multicoloured lighting, and launched into the catchy ''All This Time'' from Sting's new release, 'The Soul Cages'.'

The singer's voice is still innately expressive but has mellowed with a new resonance, especially effective on slower, soul-probing numbers such as 'Why Should I Cry For You?' and 'Fortress Around Your Heart'.

Sting is a versatile songwriter, and his superb band easily pulled off the dynamism required of his material. Dominic Miller provided chiming guitar parts and careful, well-placed solos. Vince Colaiuta's articulate drumming, wonderfully gentle when necessary, meshed with Sting's able bass playing for an often jazz-like rhythmic foundation.

Keyboardist/guitarist David Sancious offered a plethora of synthesized string, wind, piano and organ parts. He proved to be a flamboyant fireball of a keyboard soloist during 'Jeremiah Blues' and a cover of Ain't No Sunshine', and he traded guitar licks with Miller in a stellar rendition of Jimi Hendrix's 'Purple Haze'.

Highlights of the evening were an energetic set of Police tunes, including 'Roxanne', 'Message in a Bottle' and 'King of Pain', and a funk-ified 'Every Breath You Take' featuring Sting's ''friend from Virginia,'' a beaming Bruce Hornsby, on keyboards.

Power-throated Johnette Napolitano led Concrete Blonde through a too-brief opening set, which included their hit single 'Joey'.

(c) The Ledger-Star by Sue Smallwood

Versatile Sting...

As the former frontman of legendary pop/punksters The Police, acclaimed songwriter of three solo albums, social and environmental activist, and movie star, Sting slips quite easily into the category of pop icon. But his relaxed and genial performance Monday night belied any evidence of a self-absorbed superstar.

In fact, Sting opened his show by introducing another artist to the crowded house at the Hampton Coliseum, a vocalist/percussionist named Vinx. Beating tribal rhythms on a pair of unusual bongolike drums, Sting's protege sang soulful a cappella in a ranging, husky voice similar to his mentor's.

Sting and his four-piece band then took the stage, awash in multicolored lighting, and launched into the catchy 'All This Time' from Sting's new release, 'The Soul Cages'.

The singer's voice is still innately expressive but has mellowed with a new resonance, especially effective on slower, soul-probing numbers such as 'Why Should I Cry For You?' and 'Fortress Around Your Heart'.

Sting is a versatile songwriter, and his superb band easily pulled off the dynamism required of his material. Dominic Miller provided chiming guitar parts and careful, well-placed solos. Vince Colaiuta's articulate drumming, wonderfully gentle when necessary, meshed with Sting's able bass playing for an often jazzlike rhythmic foundation.

Keyboardist/guitarist David Sancious offered a plethora of synthesized string, wind, piano and organ parts. He proved to be a flamboyant fireball of a keyboard soloist during 'Jeremiah Blues' and a cover of 'Ain't No Sunshine', and he traded guitar licks with Miller in a stellar rendition of Jimi Hendrix's 'Purple Haze'.

Highlights of the evening were an energetic set of Police tunes, including 'Roxanne', 'Message in a Bottle' and 'King of Pain', and a funkified 'Every Breath You Take' featuring Sting's ''friend from Virginia,'' a beaming Bruce Hornsby, on keyboards.

Power-throated Johnette Napolitano led Concrete Blonde through a too-brief opening set, which included their hit single 'Joey'.

(c) The Virginia Pilot by Sue Smallwood

SET LIST

COMMENTS 0